Working with Temporal Tables in SQL Server 2016 (Part 2)

In my previous post, I introduced the concept of temporal data, and explained at a high level how SQL Server 2016 implements temporal tables. This post dives into the details of exactly how you create and query temporal tables.

Let’s start with an ordinary table, and convert it into a temporal table. So I’ll create the Employee table, and load it up with some data.

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To convert this into a temporal table, first I’ll add the two period columns and then I’ll enable temporal and set dbo.EmployeeHistory as the name of the history table.

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Note that because we’re converting an existing table, this must be done in two separate ALTER TABLE statements. For a new temporal table, you can create it and enable it with a single CREATE TABLE statement. Also, and because this is an existing table with existing data, it’s necessary to set DEFAULT values that initialize the period columns with beginning-of-time (1900-01-01 00:00:00.0000000) until end-of-time (9999-12-31 23:59:59.9999999) values, which is not be necessary when creating a new table, or altering an existing table with no rows.

Now when we expand to see the Employee table in the Object Explorer, you can see that it is being designated as a System-Versioned table, which is the official name for temporal tables in SQL Server 2016. It also has a special icon showing a clock over the table, and this tells you that you’re looking at a temporal table. And nested directly beneath, is the history table, dbo.EmployeeHistory, which SQL Server has created with an identical schema to match dbo.Employee.

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To effectively demonstrate how to query temporal tables, we’ll need to change some data first. You can see the current state of the data in the Employee table just as we inserted it, while the history table is completely empty because we haven’t made any changes yet:

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So let’s update and delete a few rows. I’ll update the same row for EmployeeID number 5 three times, with a 5 or 6 second pause in between each one. First I’ll change the employee name to Gabriel, then I’ll change the department name to Support, and then I’ll change the department name once more to Executive. And, I’ll also delete EmployeeID number 8:

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Now I’ll query the tables again:

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The Employee table shows the current state just as you’d expect, with EmployeeID number 5 showing the result of the latest UPDATE, and EmployeeID number 8 being deleted. But if you examine the history table, you can see the three earlier versions of employee ID number 5, corresponding with each of the three updates we ran against that row. And we also see EmployeeID number 8, which we deleted.

Let’s have a closer look at the period columns. In the main table, you can see that every row except for EmployeeID number five has period column values that span from the beginning of time until the end of time. But EmployeeID number five has a StartDate indicating that this version of the row began on August 14 at about 5:35pm. This tells you that there are earlier versions of this row available in the history table.

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And indeed, the earlier versions are visible here in the history table. Specifically, the previous version of this row is the one that ends at the same time that the current version begins, August 14th at 5:35 and 25 seconds, which is when we changed the DepartmentName from Support to Executive. This ending datetime2 value of 25 seconds past the minute matches exactly with the starting datetime2 value in the current row:

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The previous version also was also replaced by an even earlier version about five seconds earlier, at 20 seconds past the minute, when we changed the department name from Engineering to Support:

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And there’s one earlier version of the row from about 6 seconds earlier, at 14 seconds past the minute, which is when we changed the FirstName from Gail to Gabriel (this is clearly the very first version of the row, as indicated by its start date of 1900-01-01 00:00:00.0000000):

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We made our changes only 5 or 6 seconds apart, but to effectively demonstrate temporal, we’ll need to tweak that to simulate longer periods of time between changes. Now caution here, you normally wouldn’t ever touch these columns, and in fact, as long as temporal is enabled, SQL Server won’t permit you to change them. So for demonstration purposes only, I’ll disable temporal, adjust the period columns, and then re-enable temporal. This must be done very carefully so that the start and end dates of each version continue to match up exactly as we’ve seen:

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In this code, we first alter the table to disable temporal. Next we update the history table period columns so that the first change, when the FirstName was Gail, actually occurred 35 days ago, and we adjust the EndDate accordingly. The second change, when the FirstName was Gabriel and the DepartmentName was Engineering, let’s say actually occurred 25 days ago. So we adjust the EndDate accordingly, but also the StartDate so that it aligns with the first update from 35 days ago. And the third change, when the FirstName was Gabriel and the DepartmentName was Support occurred just now, so we leave its EndDate alone and only adjust the StartDate so that it aligns with the second update from 25 days ago. We also tweak the deleted row for EmployeeID number 8 so that it appears this row was deleted 25 days ago. Finally, we re-enable temporal on the Employee table.

When we look at the data now, it really does look like this table has been around for a while. I’m running this demo today on August 14th, but it’s showing changes from as far back as 35 days ago – where it appears that the first change was made on July 10th. You can also see that our updates have maintained the seamless connection of start and end dates across multiple versions of the same row:

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Now we have a table with a history of changes over the past 35 days. And the beauty of temporal is that we can instantly query this table as it appeared at any time during that period. All you do is issue an ordinary SELECT statement, and include the special syntax FOR SYSTEM_TIME AS OF.

So I’ll run four queries. The first one is an ordinary SELECT that just queries over the current version of the table. But the other three include FOR SYSTEM_TIME AS OF to query the table as it appeared two minutes ago, thirty days ago, and forty days ago:

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Let’s inspect the results.

The first query shows current data only, so we see the latest version of EmployeeID number 5, with FirstName Gabriel, and the Department is Executive. We’re also missing EmployeeID number 8, because it’s been deleted:

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The second query from two minutes ago shows the same row for Employee ID number 5, but the Department is Support, and this is because we only just recently changed the Department from Support to Executive. But EmployeeID number 8 is still missing, because it was deleted more than just two minutes ago:

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The third query is from thirty days ago, so we get an even earlier version of EmployeeID number 5, when the Department was still Engineering. And we also see the deleted row for EmployeeID number 8 miraculously reappear, because it was deleted 25 days ago, and these query results are from 30 days ago:

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And finally, the fourth query from 40 days ago shows the very original version of the table before any updates or deletes. We see the original name Gail for EmployeeID number 5, as well as the original row for EmployeeID number 8 that got deleted later on:

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As you can see, time travel with temporal tables is pretty awesome. But it doesn’t end here. Stay tuned for a future post that shows how to use the new stretch database feature to transparently migrate part or all of the temporal history table to the cloud on Azure SQL Database.

Until then, happy coding!